Burned Hands and Children: Identifying the Signs and Effects

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Read about Burned Hands and Children. Children who suffer from sibling fights are different from other children in the family.

What is it about children that causes their skin to burn so badly and how can you prevent this from happening to your children? This is a question a lot of parents, relatives, and paediatricians ask.

While it is not fully understood, chronic exposure to extreme temperatures and heat can cause damage to the tissues of the body, including the skin. Heat rash in children can be the result of many things including playing outside in the hot sun or having too many household pets.

Children who suffer burns are also likely to have suffered from other types of trauma before. The two most common sources of this type of stress are playgrounds and outdoor activities like running in the sprinklers or being exposed to extreme temperatures. These factors can combine and cause severe burns.

Among children admitted to the burn unit after experiencing burns in their bodies, more than half have been victims of other forms of trauma like cancer or head trauma.

Many doctors believe that children who are frequently left alone in the backyard or in front of the television have a greater chance of being burnt. There are several theories on why this occurs, but they have not been proven.

In fact, it has been found that children who spend a lot of time alone in front of the television are more likely to have social problems and have a number of behavioural issues. It is believed that these same children are at risk for developing severe burn injuries.

Among children burned, those with the most serious burn injuries tend to be those with weaker immune systems and are not getting the proper nutrients and minerals that are needed for their bodies.

Children who are frequently neglected are also at greater risk for developing serious burn injuries. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has found that children who are abused are more likely to suffer from burn injuries as well.

If a child is repeatedly abused they are much more likely to experience burn scarring and they will be less likely to have healthy skin later in their lives. The effects of child abuse can be devastating to a child’s immune system. Researchers believe that children who have suffered physical or sexual abuse may be at a greater risk for serious burn injuries.

Children who suffer from sibling fights and who burn more often than other children in the family are likely to be burned. Researchers believe that children who are frequently hit by their siblings do not receive the needed nutrients and minerals that they need to help them grow and develop normally.

Children who are neglected by both parents and who have sibling fights are also at greater risk for burn injuries. If a child continually gets beaten during play, there is a strong possibility that he or she may sustain burn injuries. Children who are neglected are less likely to have friends and they often turn to alcohol or drugs to self-medicate for their anger.

A study published by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases found that children who were consistently exposed to Harvard university professors had higher levels of cortisol than children in other schools. The Harvard university professors were observed by a team of pediatric rheumatologists.

They found that the levels of cortisol increased significantly when the children were exposed to these professors. It was suggested that this may be due to the children’s vocalizations as the children played.

Distressing footage emerges of children

There are numerous studies conducted on children ages six to twelve years old who are suspected of having suffered from a post-traumatic stress disorder and/or burnt hands. Most of the investigations revealed that children who suffer from PTSD and/or burnt hands tend to show signs of abnormal behavioural patterns.

Some of these children also showed signs of hyperactivity, poor concentration and memory problems, emotional detachment and depression. The burnt areas in the hands may result in blisters, sores, and bleeding, which may lead to infections and other complications. A majority of the children diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder also had characteristic symptoms of hyperactive behaviours and frequent fidgeting.

Children with burn injury also exhibit symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, and conduct disorders. Burn injuries are very painful, as evident by the presence of physical pain, bleeding, and infection. In addition, it can cause emotional trauma leading to emotional and behavioural problems.

As the child progresses from childhood to adolescence, they are likely to encounter unfamiliar events and this may trigger their symptoms. If the traumatic event has occurred in the past, it is possible that the child may have flashbacks or nightmares. Although many children recover from their injuries, there is a high possibility that some will continue to experience symptoms for the rest of their lives.

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By Bilal Gujjar

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