What is Eid ul Adha? – A Full History of Eid ul Adha

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Eid ul Adha (or Eid-ul-Adha) can be translated as the “Festival of Sacrifice.” Read the full Full History of Eid ul Adha below. This name indicates that it is an occasion to commemorate actions of sacrifice. It is a Muslim festival celebrated on the 10th day of Zilhij, the twelfth month in the Islamic year. The celebration lasts for three days.

When Is Eidul Adha Held?

The first day of this event occurs on the 10th of Zilhij, and tradition states that there should be no fighting or arguing during this time. The second day follows on from the 10th, there are no prohibitions against fighting or quarreling, and therefore, this day is a day for celebration. Eid ul Adha occurs on the third of Zilhij, which is usually the 12th or 13th of October in the Western calendar. Although Eid-ul-Adha has no direct relation to the Hajj Pilgrimage, it is but a day after the completion of Hajj and therefore has significance in time.

Eid ul Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى “‘Īd ul’ Aḍḥā”) is also known as Eid al-Adha, Eid al-Zahra, Bayram, Eid Mahabir

Eid Ul Adha history

According to Islamic beliefs, Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham) was commanded by Allah to sacrifice his son Ismail (Ishmael). Eid ul Adha marks this event as a day of remembrance. The Eid celebration commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment and obedience to God, who provided him with a lamb to slaughter instead of his son at the last moment.

Many Muslims make a pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, to celebrate Eid-ul-Adha; it is one of the most important festivals in Islam and commemorates Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son Ishmael when he was ready for sacrifice Prophet Ibrahim was willing to lay down everything he had for the sake of higher worship. Moreover, it came on the tenth day of Zilhij, during which fighting is not permitted. Eid ul Adha, therefore, is a day for grand celebration where families and friends gather together for feasting, fun, and merriment.

In Islam, there are two Eids (Celebration Festivals): Eid-ul-Fitr, which marks the commencement of the Holy Month of Ramadan; and Eid-ul-Adha, the Greater Eid, which follows the completion of the annual Hajj pilgrimage, at the time of Qurbani (sacrifice). Although Eid-ul-Adha has no direct relation to the Hajj Pilgrimage, it is but a day after the completion of Hajj and therefore has significance in time.

Qurbani in Eid Ul Adha

Qurbani in Eid ul Adha is the sacrifice of a sheep, goat, or cow in commemoration of the Eid ul-Adha. If someone can’t afford to sacrifice an animal, they should fast for three days instead. Muslims will buy a lamb from the market and give it away free after Eid prayer on Eid day. The meat will be distributed among family members, relatives, and needy neighbors. Eid Mubarak!

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By Amir Nazir

Amir Nazir is 10 Years old Content Writer, Blogger, SEO & Social Media Expert. Proud Owner of 1st site “Amir Articles” and build a new site “Answer Diary” in January 2021. The main writing categories are gaming, blogging, find a job and Education. You can contact him at [email protected] anytime.

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