Seven Tips To Make A Good Trailer

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I found myself watching some trailer the other day. Read about Tips To Make A Good Trailer. One of those long-anticipated future releases make me think how similar these audiovisual pieces tend to be in their structure. And I said to myself, “wow, someone would have to compile this in an article.” I also said to myself, “wow, surely someone has already done it,” but since I needed to fill out a post to complete the week, I decided to do it myself.

I made some short movies before and I also uploaded some nice trailers by FlexClip trailer maker on my youtube channel, and these trailers got a lot of views. So the tips to make a good trailer or, at least, to make the typical trailer comes to my mind. And beware, I’m not the first to exploit them but if something works, why not consist it?

Start slow and finish fast: Whether it’s a war tape about WWII (a genre to which about 20% of the world’s movies and video games belong) or an essay on crab farming in Uzbekistan, it’s important to always start with a couple of shots of great plastic beauty, like the waves of the sea or a sunset.

Open flat from black, without haste. It doesn’t matter if you only have 2 minutes and 30 seconds to explain the movie. The beginning should always be calm. There will be time to burn the viewer’s retinas by inserting blank flashes on one-second-long shots, something that, of course, we will reserve for the end of the trailer.

Music in crescendo: It is said of that effect by which the music rises continuously in tempo and intensity (forgive me if I misuse the musical terms, it is not my specialty) until when it seems that our eardrums are going to burst, culminates with a final apotheosis of trumpets synchronized to the rhythm of the explosions (even if it is a romantic movie, there must be some explosion, a little one).

Use an omniscient narrator by reading topical phrases: This is a non-negotiable feature of 99% of trailers. Everyone needs a narrator reading us what we can see on the screen. The phrases to be used will be chosen from the following: “In a world (add description) …” “The final battle …”, “This summer …”, “Two crazy people …”, “Get ready for …” and “Loquesea Pictures presents La incredible story of….

Gut the movie: If it is an action tape, it shows the best special effects scenes. If it’s a comedy, collect all the mildly funny jokes and sprinkle them throughout the montage. People should learn from this trick, but they always end up biting and going to the cinema to leave the room, exclaiming, “but the best was in the trailer”.

All Actors Should Shout: Actors’ voices can only appear in two ways in a trailer: if they are on screen, they should be seen yelling, “Run!”, “Now!”, “Watch out!” or “More wood!” they are examples of perfectly valid exclamations. If, on the other hand, they are not on the screen, we will use a monologue of his in which the scriptwriter has put special work, and we will match it with the images shown, creating a poetic and inspiring composition.

Add a final surprise: This is what comes out right after the end credits when the music has turned off, and it seems that the trailer is over, but no! If it’s an action movie, the main character comes out punching the bad guy, firing a couple of shots or yelling a phrase at the top of his lungs. If it’s a comedy, the main character comes out farting or something like that.

If it is a Spanish film, forget all the above: Finally, if the trailer we are editing is for a Spanish film, the above rules are invalid. In this case, the important thing is to put first all the logos of the organizations that have collaborated by subsidizing the film (with which we will easily consume about thirty seconds of final editing time).

Next, we collect all the foul jokes mounted to the rhythm of a Spanish pop song, we intersperse a couple of shots with many extras or special effects (if any) to show that we have spent the budget on. Finally, we close with the release date very large, since if the viewer gets lost, it is very likely that when they go to see it, the film has already been withdrawn from the poster.

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By Asad Ijaz Khattak

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